Everything You Need To Know Before Freezing Your New Carton Of Eggs

Freezing is widely recognised as the most efficient storage method because it stands off the growth of microbes that trigger spoilage. But, have you considered doing it to preserve eggs for longer periods? If you haven't, then you should give it a try. Read on to know more about freezing eggs and if it's right for you.

By Cookist
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If you have more eggs than you can use within a few weeks of buying them, then you should consider freezing them. All you have to do is break the eggs, store them in a clean and sealable container and then place them in your freezer.

Here's an in-depth look at the different ways you can freeze eggs safely:

HOW TO FREEZE WHOLE EGGS

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This is the easiest to do. Simply:

  • Beat the eggs until they're well blended
  • Pour into freezer containers
  • Seal tightly
  • Label with the number of eggs and the date
  • Freeze

HOW TO FREEZE EGG WHITES

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  • Break and separate the eggs. Carefully, break the eggs and separate it's constituents, one at a time, making sure that no yolk gets in the whites.
  • Pour the whites into freezer containers, seal tightly, label with the number of egg whites and the date.
  • Freeze.

Tip: To make thawing easier, first freeze the egg whites separately, in an ice cube tray before transferring to a freezer container. This will also help you quantify the eggs properly.

HOW TO FREEZE EGG YOLKS

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Egg yolks are very gelatinous and so require special steps to prevent the excessive gelation that happens on freezing, making it hard to use them in any recipe.

  • Beat the egg yolks and add either 1/8 teaspoon salt or 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar or corn syrup per 1/4 cup of egg yolks (about 4 yolks).
  • Label the container with the number of yolks, the date, and whether you’ve added salt (for main dishes) or sweetener (for baking or desserts).
  • Freeze.

HOW TO FREEZE HARD-BOILED EGGS

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It may sound strange to freeze hard-boiled eggs but you may just have to do so if you've boiled one too many for a meal.

  • Carefully place the yolks in a single layer in a pan and add enough water to come at least 1 inch above the yolks.
  • Cover and quickly bring to a boil.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and let the yolks stand, covered, in the hot water for about 12 minutes.
  • Remove the yolks with a slotted spoon, drain them well and package them for freezing.

Note: Avoid freezing hard-boiled whole eggs and hard-boiled whites because they become tough and watery afterward.

HOW TO USE FROZEN EGGS

Please keep the following in mind when thawing frozen eggs for use:

  • To use frozen eggs, simply thaw them overnight in the refrigerator or under running cold water.
  • Make sure you use egg yolks or whole eggs immediately after defrosting them.
  • Thawed egg whites will beat to better volume if you let them sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes before use.
  • Use thawed frozen eggs only in dishes that will be thoroughly cooked.

According to the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), you can freeze eggs for up to one year. Now, you'll always have some on hand!

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