These Egg Yolks Cured With Salt And Sugar Are The Perfect Substitute For Cheese

Eggs are essential in every kitchen because they can be used in a multitude of ways. But, did you know about the ancient tradition that cures egg yolks with salt and sugar? The simple recipe produces a special ingredient that can be used to augment the flavour profile of nearly any dish — think buttered toast, shrimp salads and any pasta dish!

By Cookist
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Eggs belong in every kitchen whether it's for a home cook or a professional chef, because of how versatile they really are. But, we say that this age-old curing technique is a game changer amongst all the egg recipes we've ever seen.

The ancient egg technique employs the use of leftover yolks but that doesn't make it any less unique. The creation of salt and sugar cured yolks date as far back as the 5th century in China where salt curing duck eggs has been a culinary practice in the country for thousands of years.

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In 2014, there was a resurgence of cured yolks and it became a popular staple on the fanciest restaurant menus making it even harder for many to believe how easily it can be made.

All you'll need are three everyday ingredients:

  • Egg yolks
  • Sugar
  • Salt

Instructions

  • Pour equal parts of the salt and sugar together in a bowl and mix
  • Spread the mixture onto a sheet tray.
  • Create little wells to gently rest the eggs in, then cover them with the rest of the mixture.
  • Refrigerate for four days; the finished product is firm, deeply savoury yolks that you can use almost like you would a hard cheese.

Tip: The firmness of the yolks depends on how long they are cured so don't be afraid to experiment and find your personal preference.

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As for how to enjoy the cured yolks, the possibilities are simply endless thanks to their versatile umami flavour. You can use the cured egg yolks just like you would use cheese; you can grate them over pasta, rice, or buttered toast!

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