Ginger has been used for centuries as a health booster, and the next new thing is ginger shots – drinks made from concentrated ginger root.

These shots are claimed to have impressive health benefits, and they can be taken just as ginger juice, or mixed with other health-boosting ingredients like turmeric, cayenne pepper, lemon juice or manuka honey.

ginger

Ginger shots don’t taste very pleasant due to the high concentration of ginger root, so they are made into small shots that can be taken in one or two swigs.

There isn’t a great deal of evidence on whether ginger shots are as good as people say, and most of the research on ginger has been done on high-dose ginger supplements, so it’s not clear whether ginger shots will have the same effects.

1. May be a Powerful Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant

Ginger contains a variety of antioxidants, which are anti-inflammatory and help to protect your body from damage by harmful molecules called free radicals.

The antioxidants in ginger include gingerols, paradols, sesquiterpenes, shogaols, and zingerone, which all have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

Test tube and animal studies show that ginger extract can reduce inflammation in conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory gut disease, asthma, and some cancers.

Some human studies have shown similar results, with male athletes who took 1.5 grams of ginger powder a day having significant reductions in their levels of inflammatory markers, compared to those who took a placebo.

Other common ingredients in ginger shots, such as lemon and turmeric, also have strong anti-inflammatory properties.

2. May Soothe the Stomach

Ginger is often recommended to pregnant women to relieve symptoms of morning sickness, and studies show that pregnant women who took 750 mg of ginger daily for 4 days had a significant reduction in nausea and vomiting compared to a control group.

Ginger may also help to relieve the nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy and surgery.

Other studies show that ginger may increase the movement of food through your digestive system, improve indigestion, reduce bloating and intestinal cramping.

3. Could Boost the Immune System

Ginger may be beneficial to the immune system due to the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects it has.

Inflammation is part of a normal, healthy immune response, but chronic inflammation can harm your immune system, and may make you more prone to illness. Consuming more antioxidant-rich foods like ginger could fight inflammation and help to keep your immune system working properly.

Ginger also has antiviral and antibacterial properties. One study showed that fresh ginger had antiviral effects against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), which causes respiratory infections.

Other ginger shot ingredients like manuka honey and lemon juice may also boost the immune system, as they also have antibacterial and antiviral properties.

4. Other Potential Benefits

Ginger shots may also:

Help control blood sugar: several studies show that ginger supplements can help reduce blood sugar levels. Benefit weight loss: ginger has been found to help reduce body weight, decrease appetite, and increase the thermic effect of food. Fight against cancer: some research shows that ginger could help protect against some types of cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

Possible Side Effects of Ginger Shots

Ginger shots are usually safe for most people, but when consumed in large amounts, ginger can have blood-thinning effects – although research is conflicting on this.

Those taking blood thinners like Warfarin should perhaps avoid ginger shots, and watch their ginger consumption.

People on some diabetic blood sugar medications should also be careful about consuming a lot of ginger, as it can decrease the blood sugar levels.

Adding sugar to ginger shots in the form of honey or agave nectar can lead to excess calorie intake and weight gain.

Making Ginger Shots at Home

It’s easy to make homemade ginger shots – all you need is a juicer or blender.

Add 24 grams of peeled, fresh ginger root to 60 ml of fresh lemon juice. Blend on high speed until it is cloudy. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve and keep the juice. Have 30 ml of the juice daily, and keep the rest in the fridge in an airtight bottle.